September 17, 2021

Masjidal mukarramah

love gambling

Chicago Gambling Ring Convict Gets a Light Sentence

The Chicago police recently arrested several people with ties to the Vincent DelGiudice gambling ring. With a decision from a federal judge, Matthew Knight – one of the main culprits, got with a light sentence thanks to his clean history and because of his social situation.

Matthew Knight’s Final Verdict

According to the prosecution, Matthew Knight was second in the gambling ring agent hierarchy. Despite that, he got only six months of community confinement, two years of probation, a $10,000 fine, and 100 hours of community service.

District Judge Virginia Kendall explained that the light sentence comes as a result of Matthew Knight’s clean history, his evident guilt, and his willingness to cooperate with the law keepers. The prosecution pointed out FBI experts’ claim that Knight’s gamblers might have generated as much as $18 million just in 2018, but the judge explained that despite his big role in the gambling ring, he was less guilty than DelGiudice and Nicholas Stella – a police officer who participated in the illegal betting activities.

In comparison, DelGiudice, who pleaded guilty in February, faces up to 25 years for a gambling conspiracy and money laundering. Although he’s pleaded guilty, no sentence has been pronounced yet. Nicholas Stella was already sentenced to 15 months in prison. A few people were also sentenced because of ties with the gambling ring, with former President Donald Trump personally pardoning Casey Urlacher, the mayor of Mettawa who was among the convicts.

Knight’s Tragic Story Alleviated his Sentence

Knight’s social situation also played a part in him getting a lighter sentence. The defense attorney Todd Pugh pointed out that Knight was a widower and had three young daughters to take care of. Even Judge Kendall agreed that Knight’s situation was “rather heartbreaking”.

The layer continued by emphasizing that Knight wasn’t a bookmaker whose aim was to ruin lives and he didn’t further pester bettors who had settled their account.

 “Bettors settled their account with Mr. Knight when they could, and the only consequence of not paying was not being able to continue to place bets,” Pugh added and reminded him about Knight’s willingness to cooperate with law officials.

The defense attorney concluded that although none of the aforementioned observations change the fact that Knight is guilty, they do show two things – Knight’s lack of malicious intentions and the pervasive popularity of sports betting.

In the end, the combination of all the defense’s arguments managed to get Knight out of serious trouble. He will now have to cooperate with his sentence for the next few months. In the meantime, it is yet to be seen what the court will decide on the mastermind DelGiudice’s sentence.